¿Qué caja de ritmos se usa en Solid de Ashford & Simpson?

Solucionado
RoyRogers
#1 por RoyRogers hace 2 semanas
Hola.
Después de escuchar cajas de ritmos de los 70, y las Linn, 606, 808, 909 y DMX de los 80, no logro encontrar la caja o cajas con las que se grabaron canciones como esta:

https://youtu.be/w3PoTnkLfxE

Esos timbales son un clásico de los 80 (más bien de los años 1983-1986) pero no veo que pertenezcan a ninguna de las cajas citadas.
¿Alguno de vosotros sabe qué caja/cajas puede ser?
He llegado a pensar que podría ser una Linn Drum o una DMX con los timbales procesados, pero la verdad es que no tengo ni idea.

Gracias de antemano.
Subir
Solución elegida por el creador del hilo (RoyRogers)
RoyRogers
#6 por RoyRogers hace 2 semanas
Creo que podría ser la Roland DDR-30.

https://youtu.be/X3gLJ_mjDwE

Debe haber varios módulos de sonido de batería que sonaban parecido entre los años 83 y 86, como el que ha puesto Lenny. Cualquiera de ellos podría ser.
Me quedo con el Roland, que salió el año en el que se grabó la canción y al igual que el Simmon, suena bastante clavado al de la canción.
Gracias a todos.
1
OFERTASVer todas
  • -37%
    Behringer SU9920
    69 €
    Ver oferta
  • -26%
    Audix FP-7 F9 Drumset 70th Bundle
    444 €
    Ver oferta
Wikter
#2 por Wikter hace 2 semanas
#1 pues según un extenso artículo al respecto del álbum, podría ser una LinnDrum, aunque desconozco la fiabilidad de la noticia.
Alguien escribió:
ASHFORD AND SIMPSON-SOLID.

Previously, I’ve written about two of Ashford and Simpson’s album 1982s Street Opera and 1983s High Rise. While both were commercially successful, the album that followed High Rise, would surpass both these albums and prove to be one of their most successful albums. This was 1984s Solid, which reached number twenty-nine in the US Billboard 200 and gave Ashford and Simpson their second US R&B number one. Not only that, but it gave Ashford and Simpson the fourth gold disc of their career. The title-track, Solid would prove to be the most successful single of their career, reaching number twelve in the US Billboard 200 and number one in the US R&B charts. Mind you, given the quality of Ashford and Simpson’s two previous albums, this isn’t a surprise. On both Street Opera and High Rise, the albums were crammed full of some of Ashford and Simpson’s greatest music. However, Solid would surpass both these albums. Before I tell you about the music on Solid, I’ll tell you about the background to the album which was rereleased by Cherry Pop in 2009.

For Solid, Nick Ashford and Valerie Simpson cowrote seven of the album’s seven songs. Closest To Love, one of two tracks that were on the soundtrack to Body Rock, saw Ashford and Simpson collaborate with Phil Ramone and Phil Galdston. The other track from Body Rock was The Jungle. Recording of Solid took place at 39th Street Music Recording in New York, with a band that included guitarist Sid McGinnis, bassist Francisco Centeno and drummers Chris Parker and Brian Break. Saxophonist Vinnie Della-Rocca, percussion player Sammy Figueroa and backing vocalist Ullanda McCullough all appeared on Solid. Little did they know that on the release of Solid, Ashford and Simpson would have not just one of the most successful albums of their career, but their biggest hit single.

Three singles were released from Solid, with the title-track Solid the first of this trio. It reached number twelve in the US Billboard 200 and number one in the US R&B charts. When the album Solid was released, it reached number twenty-nine in the US Billboard 200 and gave Ashford and Simpson their second US R&B number one album. Not only that, but the album became Ashford and Simpson’s fourth album ti be certified gold. The second single Outta the World only reached number 104 in the US Billboard 100, but fared much better in the US R&B and Dance Charts, reaching number four. Babies was the final single released from Solid, reaching number 102 in the US Billboard 100 and number twenty-nine in the US R&B Charts. Solid was truly a momentous album for Ashford and Simpson, surpassing the success of their two previous albums for Capitol Records. The reason for that is quite simple, with Solid crammed full of some great songs, which I’ll now tell you about.

Opening Solid is the title-track Solid, which like the album reached number one in the US R&B Charts. Instantly, it’s like meeting an old friend, the familiar strains of Valerie Simpson’s vocal swathed in echo opening the track, before Nick’s vocal enters. Accompanied by percussion, rhythm section and synths, Nick and Valerie lay bare their souls. They sing about their relationships and its ups and down. Each of them deliver their vocal with emotion and passion, while horns rasp, washes of synths and backing vocalists accompany them. Not only is the song beautiful and heartfelt, but nearly thirty years later, is a timeless classic which many people will be able to relate to.

Outta the World was the second single from the album, but has a very different sound. There’s almost a futuristic sound to the track, with just synths, drum machines and bass accompany Nick’s vocal. It’s powerful and impassioned, with Valerie replying to his call, before taking over the lead vocal. Meanwhile, a wash of synths and a Linn drum machine combine with the pounding bass guitar. Although very different from Solid, the arrangement still has a contemporary sound, with Francis Kevorkian’s remix one of the four bonus tracks on Solid. However, one thing stays the same, the quality of Nick and Valerie’s vocals.

Two tracks from Solid featured on the soundtrack for Body Rock. The Jungle is the first of these two tracks and sees Ashford and Simpson up the tempo and drama. Nick’s vocal is strong, powerful and impassioned, sung against a powerful, rocky arrangement. The rhythm section, guitar and synths accompany Nick’s lead vocal, while Valerie and Ullanda McCullough contribute soaring, soulful backing vocals. Meanwhile, the arrangement reflects the power and drama in Nick’s vocal. Marauding guitars and the rhythm section drive the arrangement along, until the song reaches its dramatic and powerful ending.

Honey I Love You returns to a more “Ashford and Simpson” sound. They drop the tempo way down, to 75 beats per minute. Nick’s vocal is tender and beautiful, while a piano, lush strings and percussion accompany him. When Valerie’s vocal enters, it has a similar beauty and tenderness, before later, horns drift above the arrangement. To me, this is by far, the most beautiful, impassioned song on Solid, with gorgeous lyrics about love and adoration.

Babies is another track where the arrangement has a much more electronic sound. While the arrangement has a different sound, the lyrics are of the quality you’d expect from Nick and Valerie. They’re about a young woman, who believing babies were made in heaven, finds her life transformed and about to become a parent. Nick who plays the role of father-to-be, delivers a vocal that’s dark and punchy. This is reflected in the electronic sound of the arrangement. Meanwhile, Valerie’s vocal is heartfelt and tinged with sadness and regret. They deliver their vocals against a backdrop of the rhythm section, guitar and synths. Together, they provide a dark, dramatic arrangement, which is fitting and sympathetic, considering the lyrics, which are like a mini soap-opera.

The Closest To Love was the second track from the soundtrack to the movie Body Rock. Like The Jungle, the arrangement is fuller and bolder, stabs of synths and percussion accompanying Valerie’s vocal. Her vocal is strong, fervent and impassioned, while the stabs of synths and percussion combine to create a dramatic backdrop. Although this track has more in common with The Jungle than other tracks, of the two tracks from Body Rock, this is the best. My reason for this is the dramatic arrangement and an amazing vocal from Valerie.

Cherish Forever More is a much more soulful and romantic track, with Nick’s emotive, heartfelt vocal accompanied by synths, a Linn drum machine and percussion. When Valerie’s vocal enters, it has a similar intensity and passion, with Nick and Valerie feeding off each other, each encouraging the other to greater heights of passion and soulfulness. Later, a sultry, seductive saxophone solo from Michael Brecker adds the finishing touch to this beautiful, romantic and heartfelt paean to love from Ashford and Simpson.

Closing Solid is Tonight We Escape (We Make Love), the last of seven songs Ashford and Simpson cowrote. To me, they’ve kept one of the most beautiful songs until last. Valerie’s vocal is gentle, with a tenderness and beauty that’s reflected in Nick’s vocal. They’re accompanied by keyboards, slow lush strings and drums. The longer the song progresses, the beauty and intensity grows. Nick and Valerie deliver the lyrics with an unrivaled sincerity and devotion. That’s what makes this not just one of the most beautiful songs on Solid, but one of the album’s highlights.

Solid was Ashford and Simpson’s third album for Capitol, continuing the quality of music on Street Opera and High Rise. Although Solid is by far, the best known track on Solid, there’s much more to the album than just one track. Tracks like Honey I Love You, Babies and Cherish Forever More demonstrate the soulful side of Ashford and Simpson’s music. Not only that, but it’s of the quality of music we’d come to expect from Ashford and Simpson during the eighties. There were two tracks from the soundtrack to Body Rock, The Jungle and The Closest To Love on Solid. While they’d a different sound, they had the quality you’d expect from Ashford and Simpson. Outta the World has a slightly futuristic sound for 1984, but nearly thirty years later has a contemporary sound. Francois Francis Kevorkian’s remix of Outta the World is one of four bonus tracks on Cherry Red’s rerelease of Solid. To me, Solid was the third in trio of quality albums Ashford and Simpson released during the early to mid-eighties. These are Street Opera, High Rise and Solid, which for a newcomer to Ashford and Simpson’s music is the perfect starting point. From their, you can rediscover not just more of the music that Ashford and Simpson released, but the music that they wrote and produced. Truly, a magical musical journey of discovery awaits you, as you discover the highlights of Ashford and Simpson’s long and illustrious career. Standout Tracks: Solid, Honey I Love You, Babies and Cherish Forever More.

ASHFORD AND SIMPSON-SOLID.

Pero vaya, escuchando la máquina en manos de Doctor mix tiene trozos los puntos de ser, con algo de ajuste y procesado.
Subir
2
RoyRogers
#3 por RoyRogers hace 2 semanas
Pues podría ser que que procesaran en la Linn la salida de los timbales.
Voy a seguir investigando a ver si encuentro algún vídeo que lo aclare.
Subir
Wikter
#4 por Wikter hace 2 semanas
Los timbales suenan a Simmons... No tiene porqué haber salido todo de una única máquina. De hecho, en la producción del disco participaron programadores, percusionistas y baterías casi por igual, en unos temas fue más electrónico y en otros más acústico, pero es de suponer que el dúo debía contar con alguna caja de ritmos para componer y arreglar y ésta acabó tomando cierto protagonismo en los temas.
Aún así, si escuchas como suenan en el vídeo de DoctorMix sobre el 2:45 que se pone a afinarlos, podrían ser perfectamente de la LinnDrum.
Subir
2
Lenny
#5 por Lenny hace 2 semanas
Subir
1
RoyRogers
#6 por RoyRogers hace 2 semanas
Creo que podría ser la Roland DDR-30.

https://youtu.be/X3gLJ_mjDwE

Debe haber varios módulos de sonido de batería que sonaban parecido entre los años 83 y 86, como el que ha puesto Lenny. Cualquiera de ellos podría ser.
Me quedo con el Roland, que salió el año en el que se grabó la canción y al igual que el Simmon, suena bastante clavado al de la canción.
Gracias a todos.
Subir
1
Hilos similares
Nuevo post

Regístrate o para poder postear en este hilo