Lo que nunca me atrevi a preguntar

  • 1
Xelmorro
#1 por Xelmorro el 31/08/2003
Muy buenas a todos. Pues ya veis, aqui se habla con tal obviedad de este asunto, que nunca me atrevi a preguntarlo, pero he sacado valor y alla va:


Cuando estas Trabajando con varias pistas de Audio, La gente habla de ecualizar cada una de ellas, tratandose de cada instrumento, de forma que 'no pise' a las demas. Yo por ejemplo escucho que un instrumento esta pisando a otro, ¿cómo puedo saber qué frecuencia es la que tengo que aumentar en una pista y disminuir en otra? yo no soy capaz de escuchar las pistas y decir 'pues estan superponiendose demasiado por el rango 3-10 KHz...' no se si me entendeis

Asi mismo, ¿Es la solucion elevar algunos dB en los armonicos y las frec. fundamentales del instrumento de la pista y bajarle otro tanto a las demas?

Nunca supe enfrentarme a esta cuestion, y poco a poco espero ir cogiendo el dominio al tema, y afinar mi oido tanto como los vuestros. pero ahora necesito un poco de ayuda. Espero que mi problema se haya entendido.

Gracias a todos.
SALUDOS!
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Dj_Geizer
#2 por Dj_Geizer el 31/08/2003
Hola. Desde hace un tiempo han publicado en http://www.futureproducers.com una de las mejores guías de EQ que he visto jamás.

http://www.futureproducers.com/forums/s ... adid/29861

Aquí te posteo un poco. El problema quizás para muchos es que está en inglés:



1

To understand EQ and its intricacies you need hands-on experience, but to help you get started, here's a table of general uses and the different ranges that EQ can affect. As every sound is different, though, these are necessarily very general guidelines...

Kick Drum

Any apparent muddiness can be rolled off around 300Hz. Try a small boost around 5-7kHz to add some high end.

50-100Hz ~ Adds bottom to the sound
100-250Hz ~ Adds roundness
250-800Hz ~ Muddiness Area
5-8kHz ~ Adds high end prescence
8-12kHz ~ Adds Hiss

Snare

Try a small boost around 60-120Hz if the sound is a little too wimpy. Try boosting around 6kHz for that 'snappy' sound.

100-250Hz ~ Fills out the sound
6-8kHz ~ Adds prescence

Hi hats or cymbals

Any apparent muddiness can be rolled off around 300Hz. To add some brightness try a small boost around 3kHz.

250-800Hz ~ Muddiness area
1-6kHz ~ Adds presence
6-8kHz ~ Adds clarity
8-12kHz ~ Adds brightness

Bass

Try boosting around 60Hz to add more body. Any apparent muddiness can be rolled off around 300Hz.If more presence is needed, boost around 6kHz.

50-100Hz ~ Adds bottom end
100-250Hz ~ Adds roundness
250-800Hz ~ Muddiness Area
800-1kHz ~ Adds beef to small speakers
1-6kHz ~ Adds presence
6-8kHz ~ Adds high-end presence
8-12kHz ~ Adds hiss

Vocals

This is a difficult one, as it depends on the mic used to record the vocal. However...Apply either cut or boost around 300hz, depending on the mic and song.Apply a very small boost around 6kHz to add some clarity.

100-250Hz ~ Adds 'up-frontness'
250-800Hz ~ Muddiness area
1-6kHz ~ Adds presence
6-8kHz ~ Adds sibilance and clarity
8-12kHz ~ Adds brightness

Piano

Any apparent muddiness can be rolled off around 300Hz. Apply a very small boost around 6kHz to add some clarity.

50-100Hz ~ Adds bottom
100-250Hz ~ Adds roundness
250-1kHz ~ Muddiness area
1-6kHz ~ Adds presence
6-8Khz ~ Adds clarity
8-12kHz ~ Adds hiss

Electric guitars

Again this depends on the mix and the recording. Apply either cut or boost around 300hz, depending on the song and sound. Try boosting around 3kHz to add some edge to the sound, or cut to add some transparency. Try boosting around 6kHz to add presence. Try boosting around 10kHz to add brightness.

100-250Hz ~ Adds body
250-800Hz ~ Muddiness area
1-6Khz ~ Cuts through the mix
6-8kHz ~ Adds clarity
8=12kHz ~ Adds hiss

Acoustic guitar

Any apparent muddiness can be rolled off between 100-300Hz. Apply small amounts of cut around 1-3kHz to push the image higher. Apply small amounts of boost around 5kHz to add some presence.

100-250Hz ~ Adds body
6-8kHz ~ Adds clarity
8-12kHz ~ Adds brightness

Strings

These depend entirely on the mix and the sound used.

50-100Hz ~ Adds bottom end
100-250Hz ~ Adds body
250-800Hz ~ Muddiness area
1-6hHz ~ Sounds crunchy
6-8kHz ~ Adds clarity
8-12kHz ~ Adds brightness




2


50Hz

1. Increase to add more fullness to lowest frequency instruments like foot, toms, and the bass.
2. Reduce to decrease the "boom" of the bass and will increase overtones and the recognition of bass line in the mix. This is most often used on bass lines in Rap and R&B.
__________

100Hz

Increase to add a harder bass sound to lowest frequency instruments.
Increase to add fullness to guitars, snare.
Increase to add warmth to piano and horns.
Reduce to remove boom on guitars & increase clarity.
__________

200Hz

1. Increase to add fullness to vocals.
2. Increase to add fullness to snare and guitar (harder sound).
3. Reduce to decrease muddiness of vocals or mid-range instruments.
4. Reduce to decrease gong sound of cymbals.
__________

400Hz

1. Increase to add clarity to bass lines especially when speakers are at low volume.
2. Reduce to decrease "cardboard" sound of lower drums (foot and toms).
3. Reduce to decrease ambiance on cymbals.
__________

800Hz

1. Increase for clarity and "punch" of bass.
2. Reduce to remove "cheap" sound of guitars
__________

1.5KHz

1. Increase for "clarity" and "pluck" of bass.
2. Reduce to remove dullness of guitars.
__________

3KHz

1. Increase for more "pluck" of bass.
2. Increase for more attack of electric / acoustic guitar.
3. Increase for more attack on low piano parts.
4. Increase for more clarity / hardness on voice.
5. Reduce to increase breathy, soft sound on background vocals.
6. Reduce to disguise out-of-tune vocals / guitars
__________

5KHz

1. Increase for vocal presence.
2. Increase low frequency drum attack (foot/toms).
3. Increase for more "finger sound" on bass.
4. Increase attack of piano, acoustic guitar and brightness on guitars.
5. Reduce to make background parts more distant.
6. Reduce to soften "thin" guitar.
__________

7KHz

1. Increase to add attack on low frequency drums (more metallic sound).
2. Increase to add attack to percussion instruments.
3. Increase on dull singer.
4. Increase for more "finger sound" on acoustic bass.
5. Reduce to decrease "s" sound on singers.
6. Increase to add sharpness to synthesizers, rock guitars, acoustic guitar and piano.
__________

10KHz

1. Increase to brighten vocals.
2. Increase for "light brightness" in acoustic guitar and piano.
3. Increase for hardness on cymbals.
4. Reduce to decrease "s" sound on singers.
__________

15KHz

1. Increase to brighten vocals (breath sound).
2. Increase to brighten cymbals, string instruments and flutes.
3. Increase to make sampled synthesizer sound more real.




3


Low Bass: anything less than 50Hz

This range is often known as the sub bass and is most commonly taken up by the lowest part of the kick drum and bass guitar, although at these frequencies it's almost impossible to determine any pitch. Sub bass is one of the reasons why 12" vinyl became available: low frequencies require wider grooves than high frequencies - without rolling off everything below 50Hz you couldn't fit a full track onto a 7" vinyl record. However we do NOT recommend applying any form of boost around this area without the use of very high quality studio monitors (not home monitors - there is a vast difference between home nearfield and studio farfield monitors costing anywhere between £5,000 and £20,000). Boosting blindly in this area without a valid reference point can and will permanently damage most speakers, even PA systems. You have been warned!

Bass: 50-250Hz

This is the range you're adjusting when applying the bass boost on most home stereos, although most bass signals in modern music tracks lie around the 90-200Hz area with a small boost in the upper ranges to add some presence or clarity.

Muddiness/irritational area: 200-800Hz

The main culprit area for muddy sounding mixes, hence the term 'irritational area'. Most frequencies around here can cause psycho-acoustic problems: if too many sounds in a mix are dominating this area, a track can quickly become annoying, resulting in a rush to finish mixing it as you get bored or irritated by the sound of it.

Mid-range: 800-6kHz

Human hearing is extremely sensitive at these frequencies, and even a minute boost around here will result in a huge change in the sound - almost the same as if you boosted around 10db at any other range. This is because our voices are centred in this area, so it's the frequency range we hear more than any other. Most telephones work at 3kHz, because at this frequency speech is most intelligible. This frequency also covers TV stations, radio, and electric power tools. If you have to apply any boosting in this area, be very cautious, especially on vocals. We're particularly sensitive to how the human voice sounds and its frequency coverage.

High Range: 6-8kHz

This is the range you adjust when applying the treble boost on your home stereo. This area is slightly boosted to make sounds artificially brighter (although this artificial boost is what we now call 'lifelike') when mastering a track before burning it to CD.

Hi-High Range: 8-20kHz

This area is taken up by the higher frequencies of cymbals and hi-hats, but boosting around this range, particularly around 12kHz can make a recording sound more high quality than it actually is, and it's a technique commonly used by the recording industry to fool people into thinking that certain CDs are more hi-fidelity than they'd otherwise sound. However, boosting in this area also requires a lot of care - it can easily pronounce any background hiss, and using too much will result in a mix becoming irritating.




4


1.) Always use a parametric EQ. Graphic EQ's are for wusses.

2.) When boosting Q must be wider (less than) than 2.

3.) When cutting Q should be narrow--from 1.5 or greater.

4.) No cut or boost may be greater than 6db +/- in any case (occasionally broken for cutting).

5.) 75% of my boosts are less than 2 db. 90% are less than 4 db of boost.

6.) Never cut more than 8db of anything unless notching out specific small frequencies.

7.) It is okay to occaionally "pile on" a wide Q boost or cut with another narrower boost/cut if you need a radical increase in that particular frequency (this makes it sound more natural and less like a resonant peak).

Okay, when I am using EQ--which I admit I do a lot of *subtle* EQing--I always aim at doing one of two things:

1.) Remove the 'bad' qualities of the sound such as rattles, hums, hiss, muddy frequency areas and so on.

2.) If there are no bad qualities that need to go, then accentuate the positive elements.

After I have taken care of those problems I then move on to actually mixing the instruments together. I always ask myself "where does this particular track live?" and aim towards cutting other tracks that intrude on that area by a few db's. The idea is to cut away parts of interfering signals to allow certain instruments to shine in particular bandwidths. This is my general schema (these are relative and only guidelines--individual mixes/use may vary):

80hz - rumble of the bass
100hz - thump of the kick
200hz - bottom of the guitar
250hz - warmth of the vocal
350hz - bang of the snare
400hz - body of the bass
500hz - clang of the high hat
600hz - clang of the cymbals
800hz - ping of ride cymbal
1000hz - meat of the guitar
1200hz - body of the snare
1400hz - meat of the vocal
1600hz - snap of the kick/plectrum on guitar (attack)
2500hz - wires and snap of snare
3000hz - presence of the vocal
4000hz - ring of ride cymbal/top end of bass guitar
6000hz - sizzle of the high hat
7000hz - sizzle of the cymbals
8000hz - top end of the kick
9000hz - brightness on snare and cymbals
10000hz - brightness on vocal
12000hz - air on vocal
14000hz - air on cymbals



...
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Xelmorro
#3 por Xelmorro el 31/08/2003
mi problema ES el ingles... pero muchas gracias. de todas formas intentare traducirlo, porque de verdad me interesa. gracias

saludos
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TK!
#4 por TK! el 31/08/2003
Ese Dj_Geizer, ¿que hariamos sin esos consejillos suyos?...un saludo campeon!,y gracias por esa guia, a mi me ha ido de fábula!y seguro que a xelmorro tambien...
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Ziryab
#5 por Ziryab el 01/09/2003
Pedazo de enlace, DJ_Geizer!. Voy tardar un tiempo en digerirlo... gracias por compartirlo.

Saludos.
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Icaro
#6 por Icaro el 01/09/2003
Genial! Como orientación es claro, sencillo y muy útil! ¿por qué cojones cerró Opening English...????
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carvalladolid
#7 por carvalladolid el 01/09/2003
Alguien escribió:

Como orientación es claro, sencillo y muy útil! ¿por qué cojones cerró Opening English...????



Como sois, el inglés esta incluido en la enseñanza pública obligatoria desde hace más de una década, solo habia que poner un poco de interés en las clases.


Un saludo.
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trocol
#8 por trocol el 01/09/2003
si claro..recuerdo aquellas entrañables clases de ingles en 8º de la antigua Educacíon General Basica y de como le tomabamos el pelo a aquella maestra tan rara.... el listening era memorable cuando le cambiabamos las cintas y le poniamos el caseto "gettho blaster" a toda hostia.

luego llego el instituto y aquello degenero en algo escabroso..el tipo me llamaba "hijo" no se si por una obsesion personal pero a mi me daba mal rollo...a mediados de curso se lo llevaron de ahi y lo internaron... no se volvio a saber de el...ni de su hijo...



slds
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lunatic
#9 por lunatic el 01/09/2003
a mi particularmente las clases de ingles de la EGB me sirvieron para descubrir que con las profesoras que estan buenas se puede tener erecciones, por lo demas.........


el mejor profesor de ingles que he tenido (y tengo) es internet
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Icaro
#10 por Icaro el 01/09/2003
no no, si de algo creo que me acuerdo!

My house is beautiful : Mi casa es bonita
The book is blue : El libro es azul

ufff, no tiremos por tierra el dinero que invirtieron mis padres en mi educación!

Saludotes!
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Icaro
#11 por Icaro el 01/09/2003
en mi caso el poco inglés que me queda se lo debo a los Beatles y a los manuales de Roland... en fin! es lo que hay
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trocol
#12 por trocol el 01/09/2003
Icaro escribió:

My house is beautiful : Mi casa es bonita
The book is blue : El libro es azul

ufff, no tiremos por tierra el dinero que invirtieron mis padres en mi educación!



lo acabas de hacer tu solito... lastima de inversion
jajaja

slds
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yidneth
#13 por yidneth el 01/09/2003
la verdad es que la verdad he tenido suerte de ser bilingüe, lo de sesame square en barrio sesamo marca un poco hahaha XD sobre todo si tienes tres años, pero a mí me pasa eso con el francés, vamos que no entiendo ni jota, así que me imagino lo que quieren decir. :). Pero bueno, la mejor forma de aprender de acuerdo que es internet, y la más divertida, pillaos dvds y vedlos en versión original con subtítulos y cuando ya vayais de más arriesgados en inglés con subtítulos en inglés. Vereis que rápido y sin daros cuenta. Mi novio ha aprendido de esta forma y en muy pocos meses se defiende pero que muy bien. Ya hasta las pone en v.o. por voluntad propia cuando vemos una peli :))) XD sin que yo diga nada :))
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Icaro
#14 por Icaro el 01/09/2003
vale, pero que no se enteren mis padres que están ya un poco mayores, a ver si con el disgusto... :mrgreen:
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trocol
#15 por trocol el 01/09/2003
yidneth escribió:
la verdad es que la verdad he tenido suerte de ser bilingüe, lo de sesame square en barrio sesamo marca un poco hahaha XD sobre todo si tienes tres años



vaya vaya vaya..otra vez el "inconsciente" nos traiciona, no era sesame square sino sesame street...al igual que no era nino casal sino tino casal...jajaja

http://www.sesamestreet.com/


slds "memoriales"
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